Category: Most Popular

Red and Green Kangaroo Paw Plant

Pruning Kangaroo Paws

Kangaroo Paws, or plants of the genus Anigozanthos, are an absolute delight to grow in your garden. Their long flower stems burst into colour during Spring and Summer, and their strappy leaves fill in an area really well.

But to get the absolute best from them they must be cared for and pruned, and we’re here to help you learn how. Read more

Gardening Tool Maintenance

This week one of our readers, Mackenzie Fox, has written in to share an article with Aussie Green Thumb on how best to look after your gardening tools, with some simple tips for getting more out of your gardening gear. Take it away Mackenzie!

One of the most important (and often overlooked) aspects of gardening is knowing how to care for your gardening tools. My own collection of gardening tools cost upwards of…you know what, I’m not going to say, but it’s a lot. For the amount of money I spent on them, I want them to be in good condition for a very long time to come.

So, let’s sort the tools into groups and have a look at what proper maintenance needs to be done on them: Read more

Product review and giveaway! Cyclone Sculpt range of shearers and loppers

Cyclone sculpt review

Here at Aussie Green Thumb, we recently got our hands on the new ‘Sculpt’ range of prunning tools from Cyclone and ran them through their paces to see how they would hold up. We’ve also got a set to giveaway; keep reading to find out how to enter in less than 10 seconds! Read more

Our Guide to Building Your Own Raised Garden Bed

Raised garden beds are a great addition to any backyard, and I’ve discussed the benefits in the past. They can be built for practical reasons like fixing poor soil or to help save your back bending when harvesting crops, or they can be built and used with design intent in mind, like as a retaining wall, or to highlight flowering plants.

Whatever reasons you have for wanting them, here is our guide to building raised garden beds in your backyard. Read more

Our Ultimate Guide to Indoor Plants.

Indoor plants are a great addition to any indoor space. Whether it be your office space or your home, adding some indoor plants can dramatically change your space. Keep reading for our Ultimate Guide to Indoor Plants.

So let’s start with the most simple question…Why? Read more

Kangaroo Paw

The simplest guide to Australian natives in your home garden

Australia has some of the most amazing and unique native plants of anywhere in the world. Our natural assets set us apart from the pack, and the plants available to us are some of the toughest and easiest to grow.

Need a stunning looking plant that won’t mind if you forget to water it, or one that doesn’t need any TLC like fertilising and pruning? Well then keep on reading, because there is most definitely an Australian native that will tick all your boxes! Here is a super simple guide to using Australian natives in your home garden.

Australian natives that can easily be grown in your backyard

Why grow natives?

The number one reason most people grow natives in their home garden, is because they’re obviously so well suited to our climate and conditions. The majority of Australia experiences long dry spells, and has pretty poor quality soil, yet we have forests and grass lands full of amazing colourful, fragrant and vibrant species.

This is because most of our natives have evolved to survive in these conditions that most others would not. This is great for us gardeners, because it makes our job so much easier!

Drought tolerant plants that don’t need to be drowned in water every summers day, and plants that can go a lifetime with virtually no fertlising or prunning; how can you say no to that!

Using Australian natives in your garden are also better for your local environment. Not only will they provide habitat and food for native birds, animals, and insects, which will boost the overall ecology in your area, the reduced use of irrigation and fertilisers will benefit your local waterways too!

Using less water to irrigate means more saved for important stuff, like drinking, and not using fertilisers means that less of this is likely to run down drains and into creeks and streams, which can cause invasive weed outbreaks and poison delicate aquatic communities.

Australian natives are also a great source of food! The traditional owners of our country couldn’t just pop down to the supermarket to pick up their dinner, so they relied heavily on what was available around them.

There are a great deal of edible Australian natives that can easily be grown in your backyard. So next time you think about your veggie patch, consider doing some research into bush tucker plants, and try using some tougher Australian natives suited to your area (and of course your tastes).

different types of native plant species

Breaking natives down.

In general terms, we can break down the different types of native plant species into 3 groups; Ground covers; grasses and sedges; and shrubs and trees. Each group has different benefits and uses in the home garden, which you should consider before you go throwing them into your yard.

Ground covers and climbers.

As the name suggests, these are plants that grow along the ground or climb up things. Most ground covers grow on the top layer of the soil they sit on and have a large underground root network, though I personally also include prostrate varieties of species in this group (Plants that grow sideways rather than up).

Climbers can be trained up trees or walls. These are great for big bulky areas where you want to cover some space. Climbers like hardenbergia violacea and hibbertia scandens are great colourful climbers that are super tough. There are also several native clematis species which can provide great smothering coverage with incredible white flowers.

Hardenbergia violacea is a lovely little climber with purple flowers

When it comes to ground covers, I think Australian natives are some of the best out. Viola hederacea and dichondra repens are great as lawn alternatives or planted amoungst pavers or stone walkways. Pratia varieties and Wahlenbergia stricta are two other amazing ground cover with super cute little flowers.

There’s also the option for prostrate growing varieties of your favourite shrubs, like grevilia, acacia and callistemons. These are best used as low flowering shrubs in the front of your gardens, so you can get the benefits, without blocking out everything behind.

Grasses and sedges
Australia has some of the best native grass and sedge species available for use in your home garden. These can be clumping plants like lomandra, pennisetum and themeda australis, which can fill in blank spaces, cover ugly spots, as well as add texture and colour to areas.

They can also include lawn alternatives, such as microlaena stipoides which makes for an amazingly soft and drought tolerant lawn.

The last use for these type of plants is for filling in trouble spots in your garden. A lot of sedges and grases are super tough and can grow in areas that many other species can’t. Ficinia nodosa, and Carex appressa are two great looking sedges that will handle the wettest problem spot in your garden.

These are also great plants to use for some natural biofiltration of waterways you may have on your property. They can help catch leaves and other junk before it washing down drains, and can even catch and help remove any bad chemicals or fertilisers before they get into the waterways.A lot of native grasses are now sold in sterile varities.

This is a good idea if you want a few feature spots in your garden, rather than a sprawling native meadow.

Shrubs and trees
This group is the one most home gardeners know and love. There are so many different native shrubs and trees available to buy, it’s really up to individual choice in what you want to achieve. The only downside of some varieties is their relatively short life span (most shrubs will be lucky to get 20years old), and this needs to be considered when you’re planning your garden. Don’t let this put you off at all, they’re still great garden choices, but doing some specific research will pay off here.

Native shrubs like lilly pillies and westringia are great for fast growing hedges and screens. Grevillea, Callistemon, Mellaueca and Leptospermum all have amazing flowers. Larger trees such as Eucalypts, Angophora, and Corymbia are your traditional gum trees, and who can forget the amazing colour and smells of Acacias (wattles). Trees and shrubs are also a really great source of bush tucker, like macadamia and Syzygium that can grow in your backyard.

What separates these shrubs from traditional exotic options are the other benefits these shrubs will bring, by providing shelter and food for native birds and animals. Using native shrubs can turn your backyard in a thriving community full of native colours and sounds!

Native shrubs like lilly pillies and westringia are great for fast growing hedges and screens

Tips and tricks for growing natives.

There’s not a lot of difficult tricks you need to know when you’re growing Australian natives, but a few things are worth noting.

Climate is the most important consideration when using Australian native plants. Unfortunately our vast continent has extremely diverse conditions, from tropical in the north, arid and dry in the middle, cool in the south, and all the coastal zones within them. This means that you really need to pick your plants to suit your conditions.

Things to consider are humidity, wind exposure, heat, frosts, and rainfall. Thankfully though, this won’t involve too much heavy research. Most nurseries will sell plants specific to the area they’re in, and most plant tags have all the basic information you need to know.

I’m not saying you can’t grow plants outside their normal climates, it just means you’ll need to work harder to simulate them, whether this be extra watering or growing them in a greenhouse. All that extra work is too much hassle for some, but it can definitely be a rewarding endeavour.

Fertlising is a no no on most natives

Pruning should be kept to a minimum, with the exception of grasses and sedges. These you can cut back regularly into an architectural ball shape, or if you don’t mind a bit of an eyesore, cut straight to the ground. For shrubs and small trees, you can prune them to shape (eg a lilly pilly hedge) as you need to, but try not to go too hard. Whilst Australian natives are tough, they can’t handle a pruning massacare.

Watering natives is also an important thing to consider. Even though many are drought tolerant, even the hardiest of plants will need some water, especially when you’ve just planted them. Australian natives are also often the victim of over loving with too much water. A good rule of thumb is if its rained recently, don’t water. If it’s been dry and your plants look like they’re wilting, give them some water. Common sense will prevail here

Fertlising is a no no on most natives. These plants are used to our nutrient poor soils, so adding artifical nutrients can have a negative affect. At a stretch, using some specific native fertiliser can help kick on some plants, as can some soft organic compost or mulch spread onto the soil.

Happy native gardening.

Australia is home to some of the most beautiful native flora in the world

Secrets to growing Australian natives year round

Australia is home to some of the most beautiful native flora in the world. The rare and unique qualities of the species that only grow in our little pocket of the planet have become highly sought after.

These unusual species of plant life dot our landscape, creating a stunning vista admired by gardening buffs and anyone with an appreciation for the majestic. So how do you foster Australian natives in your own space? And more importantly, how can you help them thrive all year round?

Creating a healthy native garden is easier than it may seem. We’ve compiled a few tips to help grow your natives.

Placement…

Grouping the correct plants together aesthetically is one thing, but arranging plants in a fashion that helps them grow properly is another equally important factor. An example is planting coverage for afternoon sun, specifically for plants that require less arid conditions. Another example could be constructing a water feature near plants that require more water so they benefit from the run off. Pockets of lawn tend to be chillier areas for plant life and ideal for cooler climate flora. On the flip side, paved areas can be perfect for plants used to arid conditions; the radiant heat generated can create the perfect microclimate. When working towards a native garden, divide your space into zones and create specific areas for your existing plants, and arrange accommodations to compliment any new arrivals.

Grouping the correct plants together aesthetically is one thing, but arranging plants in a fashion that helps them grow properly

Conditions…

You can create a welcome environment for plants to grow, and locality is key. Plants indigenous to your area will always thrive if looked after, and going too far out of that “comfort zone” may end disastrously. Keep your selection to flora that can cope with your weather conditions, stick to the correct soil type, and with a little patience you will get your desired result. Another thing you should be aware of is the wildlife in your area. Your new garden may soon be home to buzzing bees and butterfly flurries; wonderful as it may seem, your natives may attract new animals, domestic pets as well. Do your research when it comes to which plants you add to your garden, as an animal influx may not be what you are after. For example, hosting Grevillea or Lilly Pilly could invite possums and flying foxes, so be mindful of planting in communal areas.

Your new garden may soon be home to buzzing bees and butterfly may attract new animals, domestic pets as well.

Feeding…

Natives don’t necessarily require special plant food or a complex soil blend. In most cases the flora just needs the environment to be accommodating to the natural growth cycles of the plant. The majority of standard plant food on the market is adaptable enough for most native plants and there are even fertilisers specifically designed for native gardens.  A great first step is determining what feeding schedule is required at what times of the year.  If you’d like a more eco-friendly alternative, natural fertilisers such as plant and animal matter provide a kinder, more organic way to feed your natives. Adding phosphate to your household compost can positively enrich the soil. Remember when using compost to test the PH to determine if it’s mature enough to use; acid levels should equalise and the PH should be around 6-8 for good, mature compost.

Adding phosphate to your household compost can positively enrich the soil

Cutting back…

In the bush, native plants would are subjected to Australia’s extreme conditions; this includes the threat of bush fires, floods, and even being eaten. It’s for these reasons our bush land is so dense and lush. Natural regeneration occurs and the old is replaced by the new – this same theory should be applied to a native garden. A properly controlled and fed native garden will thrive and actually need to be cut back to continue to grow. Trimming at the end of the fruiting life cycle means sustained growth during the non-fruiting period and bigger, healthier blooms when the plant produces again. Even a Grevillea will bloom in all but the coldest climates if it’s properly looked after.

So you see it doesn’t have to be rocket science. Creating a native garden that will produce all year round is pretty simple and can be very rewarding.

For helpful tips and ideas, visit your local Botanical Gardens, as they are a valuable resource for more information.

Backyard landscaping ideas on a budget

Landscaping your garden can be a great way to improve your outdoor space and add value to your home. If you’re not careful though, all the little things you want to do can pile up, and the cost of doing so can get away from you very quickly. Materials, plants, and tradesmen can turn that little weekend project into a massive hit to the wallet. But it doesn’t have to be this way! Here are some tips to help you landscape your backyard on a budget. Read more