≡ Menu
Aussie Green Thumb – Top Gardening Tips For Everyday People

Plant of the Month – Acacia cognata

My last plant of the month entry featured the Acacia sclerophylla, this weeks Plant of the Month is the Acacia cognata.

Photo: Ivan Holliday on Flickr

Genus: Acacia
Species: cognata
Common Names: There are many sub-species, each with their own common name
Flower Colour: Varied
Foliage Colour: Varied
Growth Habit: Varied
Flowering: Varied

For the last Acacia variety I have chosen to do something a little different and that is pick a variety that is actually very varied. The Acacia cognata, though a plant in itself, has so many different sub-species it is actually very difficult to say ‘This is the MAIN Acacia Cognata’. The most common forms in cultivation are the low growing forms, but there are such a vast array of varieties any ‘specific’ information is hard to give.

There are some things that are common to most if not all varieties of Acacia cognata. They all prefer to grow in full sun to part shade and they all prefer a well drained soil. There are generally varieties for all climates around Australia, including coastal, inland and desert soils.

The main use of Acacia cognata in its many forms is as a fencing or hedging plant. The lower growing varieties make a great border around paths and the slightly taller growing varieties can be trained to be quite a bushy hedge, 0.5m to 1m tall. There is even a variety of Cognata that grows into a full sized tree up to a massive 10m.

Like many Australian natives the Acacia cognata does not like to much phosphorous so when fertilising, make sure that you use either a known low phosphorous fertiliser or better yet, buy a fertiliser specifically designed for Australian native plants.

With such a wide variety of different cultivars (sub-species grown and chosen for their good garden properties) you are sure to find one you could add to your garden!

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • les

    Can anyone tell me the life expectancy of Acacia Cognata green mist?

  • Sharyn

    I am also interested to know the answer as I have planted a screening hedge of “copper tops”.